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A Level Philosophy and Ethics (Religious Studies)

History, Philosophy and Theology

History, Philosophy and Theology
History, Philosophy and Theology
We are only accepting one application per candidate.

What will you be working towards?

Code NULL
Qualification Type GCE A/AS Level or Equivalent
Qualification Level Level 3
Course type Full Time

Overview

What’s it all about?

This is a great course for anybody who enjoys thinking and talking and putting all of this into writing! During the course, students will have the opportunity to explore why people behave in a certain way and to what extent this behaviour is determined, by the moral authorities around us. Students will have the opportunity to discuss, debate and form their own opinions about different world views. 

 

 

Details

What do you study?

Component 1
· religious beliefs, values and teachings, in their interconnections and as they vary historically and in the 

contemporary world, including those linked to the nature and existence of God, gods or ultimate reality, the role of the community of believers, key moral principles, beliefs about the self, death and afterlife, beliefs about the 

meaning and purpose of life

· sources of wisdom and authority including, where appropriate, scripture and/or sacred texts and how they are used and treated, key religious figures and/or teachers and their teachings

· practices that shape and express religious identity, including the diversity of practice within a tradition

· significant social and historical developments in theology or religious thought including the challenges of 

secularisation, science, responses to pluralism and diversity within traditions, migration, the changing roles of men and women, feminist and liberationist approaches

· a comparison of the significant ideas presented in works of at least two key scholars selected from the field of 

religion and belief

· two themes related to the relationship between religion and society, for example: the relationship between 

religious and other forms of identity; religion, equality and discrimination; religious freedom; the political and social influence of religious institutions; religious tolerance, respect and recognition and the ways that religious traditions view other religions and non-religious worldviews and their truth claims

· how developments in beliefs and practices have, over time, influenced and been influenced by developments in philosophical, ethical, studies of religion and/or by textual interpretation.

Component 2
· philosophical issues and questions raised by religion and belief including at least three contrasting arguments about the existence or non-existence of God, gods or ultimate reality

· the nature and influence of religious experience

· challenges to religious belief such as the problems of evil and suffering

· philosophical language and thought through significant concepts and the works of key thinkers, illustrated in issues or debates in the philosophy of religion

· how views of religious language have changed over time; the challenges posed by the verification/falsification 

debate and language games theory over whether religious language should be viewed cognitively or 

non-cognitively; and a consideration of at least two different views about religious teachings being understood 

symbolically and analogically

· a comparison of the significant ideas presented in works of at least two key scholars selected from the field of the philosophy of religion, and developments in the way these ideas are applied to issues in religion and belief

· how the philosophy of religion has, over time, influenced and been influenced by developments in religious beliefs and practices, ethics or textual interpretation

Component 3
· ethical language and thought through significant concepts and the works of key thinkers, illustrated in issues or debates in religion and ethics

· three normative ethical theories such as deontological, teleological or character based ethics (at least two of which must be religious approaches)

· the application of ethical theory to two personal, societal or global issues of importance, including religious ethical perspectives

· how ethical language in the modern era has changed over time; including a study of meta-ethical theories and significant ideas in religious and moral thought such as free will, conscience or authority

· a comparison of the significant ideas presented in the works of at least two key scholars selected from the field of religion and ethics, and developments in the way these ideas are applied to significant issues in religion and belief

· how the study of ethics has, over time, influenced and been influenced by developments in religious beliefs and practices, the philosophy of religion and/or textual interpretation



What do you get up to in Philosophy and Ethics?

Students spend considerable time in class discussing and debating ideas. Each year there is usually an opportunity to attend two conferences to hear well-known authors and speakers in their relevant field.


 

 

How will it be delivered?

There are three units with three separate two hour exams at the end of the A Level. These are, Philosophy of Religion, Ethics and Religion and A Study of Religion.

Entry requirements

5 GCSE's at grade 4 and above including grade 4 or above in GCSE Religious Studies

Your next steps...

What can you do with it?

Any student who takes this course will learn how to argue, show analysis, synthesise and evaluate. These are all key skills for a varied selection of courses and further study, such as Social Work, Psychology, Sociology,
Medicine, Anthropology, Politics and Philosophy, Law, the list is endless!

 

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