English Language and Literature A Level

Languages, Literature and Culture

Languages, Literature and Culture
Languages, Literature and Culture
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What will you be working towards?

Code HGS9
Qualification Type GCE A/AS Level or Equivalent
Qualification Level Level 3
Course type Full Time

Overview

ENGLISH LITERATURE

Examining Board: Edexcel. Head of Department: Mr M C Dickens

This course aims to give you a thorough understanding and appreciation of English literature. It examines the wide variety of responses that a piece of writing can evoke, and develops your ability to articulate your perceptions of, and insights into, a range of texts. To study English in the Sixth Form, you should have a love of reading, a willingness to engage in discussion and debate (a key aspect of the course) and the ability to learn independently.

Beyond the classroom, there are opportunities to visit our partner institution the University of Kent at Canterbury, and to attend the English Speaking Union (in conjunction with the RSC) Shakespeare day, as well as visits from outside academics. A Level English Literature promises to offer a rigorous but rewarding course for those students who enjoy reading and writing, particularly those who may be considering university study. A grounding in English Literature is ideal preparation for a wide range of degree courses, from Arts and Humanities subjects, to Law and Modern Languages.

Details

This course aims to give you a solid grounding in English Language and Literature. It examines the wide variety of responses that a piece of writing can evoke, and develops your ability to articulate your perceptions of, and insights into, a range of texts. To study English in the Sixth Form, you should have a love of reading, a willingness to engage in discussion and debate (a key aspect of the course) and the ability to learn independently.

Students study an anthology comprising a wide variety of non-fiction texts such as diaries, reviews, travelogues and speeches. In the exam they will be asked to compare ONE of these anthology texts with an ‘unseen’ text (also non-fiction). They will also study a play (drama text) and answer a question on it, starting with a printed extract and then moving to consider the play as a whole. Both questions are equally weighted.

Students also study a theme, ‘Society and the Individual’, and evaluate unseen prose non-fiction texts which consider it. This theme is also addressed by two further literary texts (likely to be prose and drama), leading to a comparative essay question.

The final component gives considerable scope for Independent Learning: students choose two texts, one fiction and one non-fiction, on a given area of study, for example travel, relationships or conflict. They produce two pieces of original writing, one fiction, one creative non-fiction, and a short commentary reflecting on their studied texts. This unit is internally marked and externally moderated. The advisory word count is 2500-3250.

Language and Literature are central to how we communicate and make sense of the world. In an increasingly digital age, the ability to communicate fluently and persuasively in English, whether spoken or written, is an integral part of most professional careers. Areas such as the media, Law, advertising and marketing, public relations, commerce and education all demand a high level of literacy and the ability to work well with others.

An A Level in English Language and Literature combines well with other Arts and Humanities subjects, but also provides breadth to those leaning more towards the mathematical and scientific professions.

How will it be delivered?


Entry requirements

English Literature

Entry Criteria: GCSE grade 6 in both GCSE English Language and English Literature

 plus GCSE grade 5 in Mathematics.

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