Economics A Level

Business, Administration and Law

Business, Administration and Law
Business, Administration and Law
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What will you be working towards?

Code NULL
Qualification Type GCE A/AS Level or Equivalent
Qualification Level Level 3
Course type Full Time

Overview

From September 2015, students have been following the new 2 year linear AQA course for A Level Economics. Economics has become high profile. The credit crunch, bankers’ bonuses and fears of a Euro meltdown are just three topics rarely out of the news in recent years, throwing a light on the importance of and divisions within the discipline. The new AS and A Level specifications catch the wave of this renewed interest in the subject with topics that will interest and intrigue students. The subject content is divided between micro and macroeconomics. Students will use economic theory to analyse current economic issues.

Over this two year course, students will study areas and topics drawn from both micro and macroeconomics.

Microeconomics:

  • The economic problem and economic methodology • individual economic decision-making • price determination in a competitive market • production, costs and revenue • perfect competition, imperfectly competitive markets and monopoly • the labour market • the distribution of income and wealth: poverty and inequality • the market mechanism, market failure and government intervention in markets.

     

Macroeconomics:

• The measurement of macroeconomic performance • how the macroeconomy works • economic performance • financial markets and monetary policy • fiscal policy and supply-side policies • the international economy.

 

A Level Assessment:

The A Level has three, two-hour written exams taken at the end of the course in Year 13.

  • Paper 1: Markets and market failure: students answer two questions, Section A – students choose one context from a choice of two; Section B – students choose one context from a choice of three.

  • Paper 2: National and international economy: students answer two questions, Section A – students choose one context from a choice of two; Section B - students choose one context from a choice of three.

  • Paper 3: Economic principles and issues: Section A - multiple choice; Section B – extended writing questions.

Details

As above.

How will it be delivered?


Entry requirements

To study this course, you should have at least a Grade 6 in GCSE English and Mathematics.

Your next steps...

You could take this course to complement other Advanced Level courses, such as Business, which could lead onto Higher Education courses in areas of Economics, Business, Accounting, Marketing or more general Higher Eeducation courses. With further training, you could go into a job related to Economics, Business, Marketing, Finance and Accounting, Human Resources and Public Relations.