Modern Languages (French or Spanish) A Level

Languages, Literature and Culture

Languages, Literature and Culture
Languages, Literature and Culture
We are only accepting one application per candidate.

What will you be working towards?

Code NULL
Qualification Type GCE A/AS Level or Equivalent
Qualification Level Level 3
Course type Full Time

Overview

Modern Languages (French or Spanish)


 

Details

Course content French:

Study of Themes including Family, Modern Technologies, Voluntary Work, Music, Cinema & Cultural Heritage in the French-Speaking World, A Diverse Society/Immigration, Crime, Young People Rights, Demonstrations and Strikes.

Study of literature and film (or two pieces of literature). Current students are studying:

•No et Moi (Delphine de Vigan)

• La Haine (Mathieu Kassovitz

Course content Spanish:

Study of Themes including Family, Modern Technologies, Equal Rights, Immigration, Racism, Integration, Celebrities, Spanish National Identity, Cultural Heritage in the Spanish-Speaking World, Young People and Politics, Popular Movements, Monarchy and Dictatorship.

Study of literature and film (or two pieces of literature). Current students are studying:

• Film: Volver (Pedro Almódovar)

• Play: La casa de Bernada Alba (Federico García Lorca)

Lots of speaking and discussions, presentations, practice of listening, reading and writing skills


How will it be delivered?

Assessment French:

Paper 1: Listening, Reading and Translation (50%)

Paper 2: Written Response to Work (20%)

Paper 3: Speaking (30%)

All examinations are externally marked. Speaking exams are usually conducted by one of the class teachers.


Assessment: Spanish:

Paper 1: Listening, Reading and Translation (50%)

Paper 2: Written Response to Work (20%)

Paper 3: Speaking (30%)

All examinations are externally marked. Speaking exams are usually conducted by one of the class teachers.


Entry requirements

Grade 6 or above at French GCSE. 

Grade 6 or above (or equivalent) at Spanish GCSE. 

Your next steps...

Why choose French:
French is an excellent A Level to study, because it’s a real chance to develop your opinions and analytical skills. Although it’s sold as ‘French’ you actually get a good overview of society, history and literature, as well as achieving an almost fluent level of a foreign language by the end of the course. This makes it an excellent subject for preparing you for further study and you will be the master of university quizzes and have a good knowledge of culture after the A Level. Also many leading universities, including Russell Group, consider MFL as facilitating subjects for entry to all courses.
There are lots of excellent ways to improve your French, and each theme fits nicely with a film to watch and music to listen to, making a change from formal reading and essay-writing which you might be doing a lot of during your A Level Studies.

Skills and progression:
Studying French will lead you to a variety of options, whether you’d like to study it at degree level, or not. French study can lead to jobs in the European Union: imagine interpreting for Brexit Negotiations, or translating legal documents. You could work abroad; in any Francophone country, not just France, and it would set you up to learn other languages. You could be posted to other countries working for the government after intensive language courses in lesser-known languages.
If you choose not to study French past A Level, you will have gained skills in debate, essay writing, analysis, interpreting data and statistics and independent research, all of which set you up as a very effective student or colleague for the future.

Why choose Spanish:
Spanish is an excellent A Level to study, because it’s a real chance to develop your opinions and analytical skills. Although it’s sold as ‘Spanish’ you actually get a good overview of society, history and literature, as well as achieving an almost fluent level of a foreign language by the end of the course. This makes it an excellent subject for preparing you for further study, and you will be the master of university quizzes with an excellent knowledge of Spanish and Latin American culture. Furthermore, many leading universities, including Russell Group, consider MFL as facilitating subjects for entry to all courses.
There are lots of excellent ways to improve your Spanish and each theme offers myriad supporting material to enjoy such as films, television shows and music, making a change from the more formal reading and essay-writing usually associated with A Level Studies.

Skills and progression:
Studying Spanish will lead you to a variety of options, whether you’d like to study it at degree level, or not. Spanish study could lead you to a job in the European Union: imagine interpreting or translating legal documents. You could work abroad; in any Spanish speaking country, not just Spain, think Mexico, Argentina, Chile or Colombia. It would also set you up to learn other languages and you could even find yourself posted to other countries working for businesses or government after intensive language courses in lesser-known languages.
If you choose not to study Spanish past A Level, you will have gained skills in debating, essay writing, analysis, interpreting data and statistics and independent research, all of which set you up as a very effective student or colleague for the future